Tropicana is introducing a breakfast cereal you can eat with your orange juice in the bowl.

The juice giant announced that it is testing a cereal that is meant to be eaten with orange juice instead of milk. “Tropicana Crunch” is advertised as “the first cereal made for OJ (and maybe the last).” Tropicana will be giving away free boxes through an exclusive website, tropicanacrunch.com, beginning on National Orange Juice Day, May 4, while supplies last.

“Prepare your mind and cereal bowl for an unforgettable breakfast experience,” Tropicana wrote on the cereal’s website, advertising the experimental cereal as “crispy and ready to get citrusy.”

“Orange juice on cereal,” the website continues. “Some call it weird. Some call it breakfast. We . . . didn’t even know it was a thing. But it turns out, there are totally normal people amongst us juicing up their cereal bowls. You might be one of them! So for those who are cereal curious like us, we made Tropicana Crunch. Cereal that’s down to be drowned in OJ. Honey almond clusters that are made to be spooned and sipped. A breakfast taste test we can all take together. Because whether you hate it or love it, you won’t know until you try it. Tropicana Crunch. It may not be for everyone (but it could be for you!)[.]”

The box describes Tropicana Crunch as a “honey almond cereal.” A spokesperson for the company told Food and Wine Magazine that it multiple flavors and textures tested to see which would combine the best with orange juice. The spokesperson said the company decided on a granola base for the cereal because it would withstand the acidity of orange juice better than corn or bran flake-based cereals, which turned soggy much more quickly. The company selected the honey almond flavor because it would balance the tart flavor of the juice. The box also comes with a “paper sipping straw inside,” for taste-testers to drink the leftover juice from the bowl.

Market research conducted by Wakefield Research for Tropicana found that some 15 million people in the United States have at least tried putting orange juice in their cereal instead of milk, and 52 million had either tried it already or were willing to try it, ABC 4 Utah reported, citing a press release by the company. The company conducted another survey of 1,000 adults to confirm that previous research, the Miami Herald reported, and found similar results. “Half of the adults who poured OJ over their cereal did so because they thought it looked like it would taste good and more than 1 in 3 who tried it, did so because they love OJ and thought it would be a good combination,” Tropicana said.

This is not the first novel product Tropicana has given away, either. The company debuted a limited-edition toothpaste to celebrate National Brush Day on November 1, 2021. The toothpaste, which was given away to Instagram users who commented on Tropicana’s page, was created to protect the flavor of orange juice after brushing your teeth, by excluding a cleaner called sodium lauryl sulfate. “Tropicana Toothpaste is different from other toothpaste because it was specifically designed to protect the delicious taste of orange juice,” a brand representative told Food Network at the time. “It does not include sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as an ingredient, a cleaning agent prevalent in toothpaste that contributes to the bitter aftertaste from brushing your teeth with toothpaste and then drinking OJ.” Citing another survey conducted by Tropicana, Food Network reported that 80% of respondents said that brushing their teeth before drinking orange juice ruined the taste.

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